Indian Institute of Management, Kolkata

Indian Institute of Management Calcutta was the first of these IIMs, and was established on 13 November 1961 in collaboration with the MIT Sloan School of Management, the government of West Bengal, the Ford Foundation and the Indian industry. Its first Director was K. T. Chandy, the former Chairman of Hindustan Unilever Limited.

After India became independent in 1947, the Planning Commission was entrusted to oversee and direct the development of the nation. India grew rapidly in the 1950s, and in the late 1950s the Commission started facing difficulties in finding suitable managers for the large number of public sector enterprises that were being established in India as a part of its industrial policy. To solve this problem, the Planning Commission in 1959 invited Professor George Robbins of the University of California to help in setting up an all India level institute of management studies. Based on his recommendations, the Indian government decided to set up two elite management institutes, named Indian Institutes of Management.

Indian Institute of Management Calcutta was the first of these IIMs, and was established on 13 November 1961 in collaboration with the MIT Sloan School of Management, the government of West Bengal, the Ford Foundation and the Indian industry. Its first Director was K. T. Chandy, the former Chairman of Hindustan Unilever Limited.

In its initial years, IIM Calcutta operated from Emerald Bower, Barrackpur Trunk Road, Kolkata. The foundation stone of the current IIM-C campus in Joka, Kolkata, was laid by Morarji Desai, who was then the Deputy Prime Minister of India on 15 Dec 1968. The institute moved to the new campus in 1975.

iimc-759
Entrance Gate of IIM-C

Campus

The main campus of IIM Calcutta, covering 135 acres (0.5 km2) of area, is located in Joka, on the outskirts of Kolkata, India. The institute moved to its present campus in 1975. IIM Calcutta is regarded as the B-School which offers the best on-campus living experience amongst Indian B-Schools.

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Teaching Blocks

IIM Calcutta’s main Academic Block is situated next to the main administrative building and has four large lecture halls and several additional classrooms. Another academic building named New Teaching Block was opened in 2000 to supplement the main block. All classrooms and lecture halls are air conditioned and have advanced audio-visual and multimedia capabilities. A new Academic Block has also been constructed and was declared open by the Prime Minister of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh in August 2011.

Auditorium

The Auditorium at IIM Calcutta, popularly called the Audi, is considered to be the best among any academic campus in India, and hosts most of the important functions in the campus like the convocation, conferences, student events and talks. The facility seats 750 people and was built at a cost of over ₹90 million (US$1.4 million). It is fully air-conditioned and is equipped with ultra-modern equipment including professional audio and visual systems.

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Auditorium of IIM-C

Library

The IIM-C library is named Bidhan Chandra Roy Library or BC Roy Memorial Library, after Bidhan Chandra Roy, the second Chief Ministerof the state of West Bengal and the first Chairman of the institute. The library is primarily envisioned to meet the requirements of the IIM-C’s academic programmes. The largest management library in Asia, it was started with a grant from the Ford Foundation. It houses over 160,000 volumes and also subscribes to hundreds of management journals and provides access to a large collection of electronic databases. The library processes and functions are fully computerized and in addition to print material, it provides access to more than 40,000 online full text journals.

Management Center for Human Values

The Management Center for Human Values (MCHV) is aimed at “integrating the soft and subtle dimension of human values with the mainstream of skill-dominated management education“. Its mission is to integrate the soft and subtle dimension of human values with the mainstream of skill-dominated management education. The center is located in separate buildings in a serene part of the campus, surrounded by beautiful gardens. Its striking conical buildings are architecturally striking from the outside and are designed to be quite sanctums of learning and contemplation on the inside.

Iimc_mchv
MCHV of IIM-C

Hostels & Accommodation

IIM-C has 4 main hostels for students pursuing its PGDM, PGDCM and Fellow programmes – Ramanujan Hostel (colloquially called Old Hostel), Tagore Hostel & Annexe (collectively called the White Hostel), New Hostel and Lake View Hostel. Students with families are provided separate family accommodation. However, PGP students are provided single boarding accommodation only. Preference is given to FPM & PGPEX students for hostel allotment. There are separate hostels for PGPEX and PGPEX-VLM programmes. Single accommodation for PGPEX students is arranged in Management Development Center(MDC). MDC is managed by Hotel Sarovar and facilities provided are equivalent to 3-star hotel accommodation. Students pursuing other courses are usually provided accommodation in the Tata Hall, the guest house in the campus.

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Hostel Block of IIM-C

Financial Research and Trading Lab

Established in November 2008, the Financial Research and Trading Lab at IIM Calcutta gives an opportunity to students and faculty members to test financial models with “live” information from the major markets of the world like India’s National Stock Exchange, Multi Commodity Exchange, National Commodity and Derivatives Exchange, Bombay Stock Exchange and Bloomberg. The lab is the only one of its kind in India, and has advanced industry-standard equipment and facilities including 51 trading terminals, trading simulators and Bloomberg Terminals. The lab is aimed to help in academic programmes, research on financial markets, product design and testing, executive education and in organising international and national conferences on finance. The laboratory gives students a hands-on experience in financial market data analysis and modelling, and also helps in advanced applied research in financial markets.

New Campus

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New Campus of IIM-C
The New Campus is composed of two large “houses” each accommodating 175 students in private rooms with attached balconies. A multi-level Student Commons with two levels of dining seating 200 covers on each floor and a large recreation area on the top floor serves the intellectual community. An Executive Centre with 200 suites and rooms, having training and syndicate rooms and well fitted executive dining and recreation areas is well under construction.

This new residential campus is connected to the existing campus via an innovative steel bridge which was awarded the most innovative steel structure in India in 2010 by the Indian Institute of Steel Research and Development, Ministry of Industries, GOI.

In the main campus a new Academic wing was opened in early 2011 that accommodates amphitheater lecture halls, computer laboratories, incubation areas, faculty offices, class rooms and syndicate rooms on five levels. A new Amphitheater Complex with five large amphitheaters of which two are for 200, 150 and 100 seats respectively shall enhance the teaching capacity of the Institute. These striking structures will enclose the Academic Quadrangle that will become the central focus of the new campus.

The new campus plan and the new buildings are designed by the internationally acclaimed architect Christopher Charles Benninger of Pune, India.

Indian Institute of Management

After India became independent in 1947, the Planning Commission was entrusted to oversee and direct the development of the nation. India grew rapidly in the 1950s, and in the late 1950s the Commission started facing difficulties in finding suitable managers for the large number of public sector enterprises that were being established in India as a part of its industrial policy. To solve this problem, the Planning Commission in 1959 invited Professor George Robbins of UCLA to help in setting up an All India Institute of Management Studies. Based on his recommendations, the Indian government decided to set up two elite management institutes, named Indian Institutes of Management. Calcutta and Ahmedabad were chosen as the locations for the two new institutes.

The Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) are a group of 20 publicautonomous institutes of management education and research in India. They primarily offer postgraduatedoctoral and executive education programmes. The establishment of IIMs was initiated by Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of India, based on the recommendation of the Planning Commission.

IIMs are registered as societies under the Indian Societies Registration Act.[3] Each IIM is autonomous and exercises independent control over its day-to-day operations. However, the administration of all IIMs and the overall strategy of IIMs is overseen by the IIM council. The IIM Council is headed by India’s Minister of Human Resource Development and consists of the chairpersons and directors of all IIMs and senior officials from the Ministry of Human Resource Development of the Government of India.

After India became independent in 1947, the Planning Commission was entrusted to oversee and direct the development of the nation. India grew rapidly in the 1950s, and in the late 1950s the Commission started facing difficulties in finding suitable managers for the large number of public sector enterprises that were being established in India as a part of its industrial policy. To solve this problem, the Planning Commission in 1959 invited Professor George Robbins of UCLA to help in setting up an All India Institute of Management Studies. Based on his recommendations, the Indian government decided to set up two elite management institutes, named Indian Institutes of Management. Calcutta and Ahmedabad were chosen as the locations for the two new institutes.

The institute at Calcutta was established first, on 13 November 1961, and was named Indian Institute of Management Calcutta or IIM Calcutta. It was set up in collaboration with the MIT Sloan School of Management, the government of West Bengal, the Ford Foundation and the Indian industry. The institute at Ahmedabad was established in the following month and was named Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad. Like MIT Sloan in the case of IIM Calcutta, Harvard Business School played an important role in the initial stages of IIM Ahmedabad.

In 1972, a committee headed by Ravi J. Matthai took note of the success of two established IIMs and recommended the setting up of two more IIMs. Based on the committee’s recommendation, a new IIM was established in Bangalore (IIM Bangalore) the next year, and was originally intended to cater exclusively to the needs of public sector enterprises. In 1981, the first IIM Review Committee was convened to examine the progress of the three existing IIMs and to make recommendations. The committee noted that the three IIMs were producing around 400 PGP graduates every year and that they had reached their optimum capacity. It proposed the opening of two more IIMs to meet the rising demand of management professionals. It also recommended expanding the Fellowship programmes to meet the growing demand of faculty in management schools in India. The fourth IIM (IIM Lucknow) was established in 1984 based on the committee’s recommendation.

Two more IIMs were established in Kozhikode (IIM Kozhikode) and Indore (IIM Indore) in 1996. Since 2007, fourteen new IIMs have been set up, taking the total number of IIMs to 20, IIM-Jammu being the latest one started in 2016.

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Location of IIMs

The list of Institutes are-:

Indian Institutes of Management (in order of establishment)
Serial no
Name
Photo
Short Name
Established
Location
State/UT
Website
1
Indian Institute of Management Calcutta
IIM Calcutta Auditorium 1.jpg
IIM-C
1961
Kolkata
West Bengal
iimcal.ac.in
2
Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad
IIM Panorama Ahmedabad.JPG
IIM-A
1961
Ahmedabad
Gujarat
iima.ac.in
3
Indian Institute of Management Bangalore
IIMB Entrance.jpg
IIM-B
1973
Bangalore
Karnataka
iimb.ac.in
4
Indian Institute of Management Lucknow
IIM Lucknow Entrance.JPG
IIM-L
1984
Lucknow
Uttar Pradesh
iiml.ac.in
5
Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode
IIM Kozhikode Aerial View s.jpg
IIM-K
1996
Kozhikode
Kerala
iimk.ac.in
6
Indian Institute of Management Indore
IIM Indore pano.jpg
IIM-I
1996
Indore
Madhya Pradesh
iimidr.ac.in
7
Indian Institute of Management Shillong
IIM Shillong Building.jpg
IIM-S
2007
Shillong
Meghalaya
iimshillong.ac.in
8
Indian Institute of Management Rohtak
IIM Rohtak Faculty Block.png
IIM-R
2010
Rohtak
Haryana
iimrohtak.ac.in
9
Indian Institute of Management Ranchi
IIM Ranchi academic block.jpg
IIM-Ranchi
2010
Ranchi
Jharkhand
iimranchi.ac.in
10
Indian Institute of Management Raipur
IIM-Raipur
2010
Raipur
Chhattisgarh
iimraipur.ac.in
11
Indian Institute of Management Tiruchirappalli
IIM-T
2011
Tiruchirappalli
Tamil Nadu
iimtrichy.ac.in
12
Indian Institute of Management Kashipur
Indian Institute of Management, Kashipur.jpg
IIM-Kashipur
2011
Kashipur
Uttarakhand
iimkashipur.ac.in
13
Indian Institute of Management Udaipur
IIM-U
2011
Udaipur
Rajasthan
iimu.ac.in
14
Indian Institute of Management Nagpur
IIM-N
2015
Nagpur
Maharashtra
iimnagpur.ac.in
15
Indian Institute of Management Visakhapatnam
IIM-V
2015
Visakhapatnam
Andhra Pradesh
iimv.ac.in
16
Indian Institute of Management Bodh Gaya
IIM-BG
2015
Bodh Gaya
Bihar
iimbg.ac.in
17
Indian Institute of Management Amritsar
IIM Amritsar, Dec 2015.jpg
IIM Amritsar
2015
Amritsar
Punjab
iimamritsar.ac.in
18
Indian Institute of Management, Sambalpur
IIM Sambalpur
2015
Sambalpur
Odisha
iimsambalpur.ac.in
19
Indian Institute of Management, Sirmaur
Indian Institute of Management Sirmaur.jpg
IIM Sirmaur
2015
Sirmaur district
Himachal Pradesh
iimsirmaur.ac.in
20
Indian Institute of Management, Jammu
IIM Jammu
2016
Jammu
Jammu and Kashmir
iiml.ac.in/jammu

Indian Institute of Management Calcutta was the first IIM to be set up, on 13 November 1961. Its main campus is located in Joka, in the outskirts of the city of Calcutta.

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad was the second IIM to be set up, on 16 December 1961.

Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, the third IIM to be established, was set up in 1973. Its main campus is located in Bilekahalli, Bangalore. 

Indian Institute of Management Lucknow is the fourth IIM to be established, in 1984. In addition to its primary campus in Lucknow, it has an additional campus in Noida

Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode, the fifth IIM, was established in 1996 and started its first batch of students in 1997. IIM Kozhikode was the first institute in Asia to offer a distance learning programme in management for working executives.

Indian Institute of Management Indore, the sixth IIM, was established in 1996. Its 193 acres (78 ha) campus is located on at Rau, near Indore.

Indian Institute of Management Shillong, also known as Rajiv Gandhi Indian Institute of Management, was the seventh IIM established, following a 2005 decision by the Government of India. The foundation stone of the institute was laid on 1 December 2007 and started its academic session from 2008–’09.

Indian Institute of Management Rohtak, the eighth IIM to be inaugurated, was the first of the six IIMs established in 2010–2011 as part of the Eleventh Five-Year PlanIt was inaugurated and started operation on 30 June 2010 with IIM Lucknow as mentor, from a temporary campus at Maharishi Dayanand University.

Indian Institute of Management Ranchi, the ninth IIM to be established in 2010 with IIM Calcutta as its mentor, started operations on 6 July 2010.

Indian Institute of Management Raipur, the tenth IIM, was inaugurated on 11 October 2010. It was mentored by IIM Indore. It currently operates at the Government Engineering College (GEC), Sejbahar. Construction of the permanent campus has started on August 2011.

Indian Institute of Management Tiruchirappalli, the eleventh IIM, was inaugurated on 4 January 2011. It was mentored by IIM Bangalore and operates temporarily from the campus of National Institute of Technology, Trichy. It would be shifting to its permanent campus spread across 175 acres in January 2017. It also has its campus in Chennai which offers program in Business Management for executives.

Indian Institute of Management Kashipur, the twelfth IIM, started operation in July 2011, under the mentorship of IIM Lucknow. The foundation stone for the permanent campus in the Escorts Farm Area of KashipurUttarakhand, was laid in April 2011.

Indian Institute of Management Udaipur, the thirteenth IIM, started operation in July 2011 from a temporary campus at the Mohanlal Sukhadia University. Initially proposed to be slated under the mentorship of IIM Indore, the institute is the first new IIM working autonomously since its inception in 2011. Construction of the permanent campus has begun, and the first phase would be complete by April 2016.

Indian Institute of Management Nagpur, the fourteenth IIM, commenced operations in 2015 under the mentorship of IIM Ahmedabad. The institute is operating out of a temporary campus VNIT, with its own permanent campus under development and expected to be ready in 3–4 years. 

Indian Institute of Management Visakhapatnam, the fifteenth IIM, commenced operations in 2015 under the mentorship of IIM Bangalore. The institute is operating out of a temporary campus from Andhra Bank School of Business Building in Andhra University campus, with its own 300 acre permanent campus under development at Gambheeram and is expected to be ready in 3 years. 

Indian Institute of Management Bodh Gaya the sixteenth IIM, is located in the sprawling campus of Magadh University (Bodh Gaya). Till its 118-acre permanent campus comes up, IIM Bodh Gaya will operate from the state-of-the art Institute of Distance Education building of the Magadh University. The newly constructed boys and girls hostel are already in place. IIM Bodh Gaya is being mentored by the IIM Calcutta (the oldest IIM in the country).

Indian Institute of Management Amritsar is temporarily located in the campus of Government Polytechnic College, till its own 60 acre permanent campus comes up at Manawala on Amritsar-Jalandhar GT Road. IIM Amritsar is being mentored by the IIM Kozhikode, is the seventeenth IIM.

Indian Institute of Management Sambalpur the eighteenth IIM is temporarily located in the campus of Silicon Institute of Technology, Sason. Its own 200 acre permanent campus coming up at Basantpur. IIM Sambalpur is being mentored by the IIM Indore.

Indian Institute of Management Sirmaur started operation in 2015. It is being mentored by IIM Lucknow. It is temporarily located in the campus of Himachal Institute of Technology, in Paonta Sahib till its own 200 Acre permanent comes up at Dhaulakuan.

Indian Institute of Management Jammu started operation in 2016. It is being mentored by IIM Lucknow. It is temporarily located in the campus of Government College of Engineering and Technology, Jammu at the old university campus.

Avadh Shilpgram

With a rich culture, a legacy of crafts and heritage, Lucknow needed a dedicated platform to encourage its craftsmen and artisans. Also, being the capital of the state of Uttar Pradesh, India, it needed a single platform to help promote the culture of crafts of the entire state and of the Awadh region in particular, in a holistic fashion. Designed by Sourabh Gupta from Studio Archom, Awadh Shilpgram was the answer to these needs and gives craftsmen opportunities to elaborate and share, interact and learn, teach and sell their arts and crafts to people and art lovers without the help of middlemen.

Building Name – Avadh Shipgram (Urban Bazaar)

Location            – Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Architect           – Archohm (Principle Architect -Saurabh Gupta)

Design Team      – Suboor Ahmad, Jeevan Das, Dhanbeer Rawat

Manufacturers  – Carrier, Philips Lighting, Schreder, MARINO, MOON LIGHT HEPER, JOHNSON, Aubrilam, Bajaj, Parryware, Somany, Trilux, Jaguar, KOMPAN

Structural          – Lkt Engineering Consultants Ltd.

Electrical           – Archohm Consults

Civil                    – Avas Evam Vikas Parishad

Landscape        – Bios Ecology And Art Landscape Architecture

Plumbing          – Techno Engineering Consultants

HVAC                 – ABID HUSSAIN CONSULTANTS

PMC                   – Avas Evam Vikas Parishad

Client                – Avas evam Vikas Parishad

Project Year    – August,20, 2016

Description    –

With a rich culture, a legacy of crafts and heritage, Lucknow needed a dedicated platform to encourage its craftsmen and artisans. Also, being the capital of the state of Uttar Pradesh, India, it needed a single platform to help promote the culture of crafts of the entire state and of the Awadh region in particular, in a holistic fashion. Designed by Sourabh Gupta from Studio Archom, Awadh Shilpgram was the answer to these needs and gives craftsmen opportunities to elaborate and share, interact and learn, teach and sell their arts and crafts to people and art lovers without the help of middlemen.

awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_dezeen_2364_ss_9-852x614

Awadh Shilpgram is a visual and experiential mélange, typically like Indian urban Bazaars. Its program facilitates activities of leisure, recreation and an indulgence in food and socio- cultural celebrations and encourages shopping that supports livelihoods and keeps alive the legacy of arts and crafts. It houses nearly two-hundred craft shops, craft courts for workshops, an amphitheatre, a food court serving cuisine from different states and other supportive facilities.

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The layout of the twenty-acre Awadh Shilpgram has evolved organically from the commercial, cultural, social and leisurely interactions of people. Light, air and circulation through cross-ventilation further added a dimension of comfort to the design, and its articulation has been realised through a contemporary interpretation of traditional elements of arches and Jaalis. The built environment thus is an interpretative collage, a gesture responding to the unique traditional architecture of the Roomi Darwaza and Imambaras.

With nearly two-hundred craft shops of which some are air conditioned, craft courts, a dormitory hostel, an auditorium, and a food court with stalls serving cuisine from different states, Avadh Shilpgram indeed provides generous facilities to visitors and artisans.

awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_dezeen_2364_ss_5-852x614

From an entrance courtyard, a spiralling structure lined with craft shops leads visitors gradually towards an open plaza at the centre of the curving building.

“An elliptical form enables a smooth corner-free circulation,” explained the architects.

“It narrows down while spiralling inward, and emulates the density and vibrancy of traditional Lucknowi bazaars, which have streets that get progressively narrower.”

The eight-hectare site is located close to a major highway in a rapidly developing area of the Uttar Pradesh region’s capital city.

The area’s historic structures also influenced the design of the campus. In particular, the arches of Agra’s Buland Darwaza – also known as the Gate of Magnificence – informed an arch-lined colonnade flanking the spiralling passage.

The arch, being an important architectural element of the architecture of the city of Lucknow, is introduced as a skin to the inner face of the buildings,” the architects added, “but is given a make-over in a contemporary style with continuous access beneath it.”

awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_dezeen_2364_ss_10-852x614

Perforated stone jali screens traditionally used to channel cool air into the rooms of Indian buildings are incorporated into the steel frames of the double-height arches, which allow entry to the circulation space at ground-floor level.

The intricate patterns carved into the jalis are based on traditional Chikan embroidery.

The open area at the centre of the complex contains a stepped amphitheatre that incorporates planted beds. A paved ramp provides access to the upper level, which looks down towards the circular stage.

Outside of the main spiral building, a cluster of stone-walled structures with rounded turf-covered roofs provide demonstration areas where artisans can conduct workshops observed by groups seated on benches incorporated into the inner walls.

awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_dezeen_2364_col_18-1704x1813

Elsewhere on the campus is an arc-shaped exhibition hall and a food court that look onto a circular lawn with a fountain at its centre. The main buildings are clad with red Agra sandstone that helps to unify their diverse forms and functions.

The unique concept along with the form, scale, materials and elements that render the architecture give an iconic building to the city of Nawabs and the people of Lucknow.

AWADH_1
Concept Evolution
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Site Plan with Sections
awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_dezeen_site-plan_1_
Site Plan
awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_section-1
Section 1-1
awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_section-2
Section 2-2
awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_section-3
Section 3-3
awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_section-4
Section 4-4
awadh-shilpgram-archohm-architecture-lucknow-uttar-pradesh-india-arches_section-5
Section 5-5

D:sharedGround level Site Plan SITE PLAN (1)

D:sharedGround level Site Plan SITE PLAN (1)

 

 

Museum of Tomorrow

The design of the Museum is inspired by the Carioca culture and through its architecture, explores the relationship between the city and the natural environment.
The Museum includes 5,000 square meters of temporary and permanent exhibition space, as well as a 7,600 square meter plaza that wraps around the structure and extends along the dock.
The building features large overhangs 75 meters in length on the side facing the square and 45 meters in length on the side facing the sea.
 

Building Name                     – Museum of Tomorrow

Location                                – Praça Mauá, 1 – Centro, Rio de Janeiro – RJ, 20081-240, Brazil

Architect                               – Santiago Calatrava

Project Year                          – December 17, 2015

Description      –

  • The design of the Museum is inspired by the Carioca culture and through its architecture, explores the relationship between the city and the natural environment.
  • The Museum includes 5,000 square meters of temporary and permanent exhibition space, as well as a 7,600 square meter plaza that wraps around the structure and extends along the dock.
  • The building features large overhangs 75 meters in length on the side facing the square and 45 meters in length on the side facing the sea.
  • These features highlight the extension of the Museum from the dock into the bay.
  • The permanent exhibition is housed upstairs, and features a roof 10 meters high with panoramic views of Guanabara Bay.

santiago-calatrava-museum-of-tomorrow-museu-do-amanha-rio-de-janeiro-designboom-10

  • The total height of the building is limited to 18 meters, which protects the view from the bay of Sao Bento Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
  • The cantilevering roof with its large mobile wings and the facade structure expand almost the full length of the pier emphasizing the extension into the Guanabara Bay, while minimizing the building’s width.
  • A reflection pool surrounding the building on the outside—used to filter water that is being pumped from the bay and released back in from the end of the pier— gives visitors the impression that the Museum is floating.
  • The building is orientated in the north-south direction, off-center from the pier’s longitudinal east- west axis, maximizing a continuous landscaping feature containing beautiful gardens, paths and leisure areas along the southern length of the pier.
  • A park walkway around the perimeter of the pier will allow visitors to circumnavigate the Museum, while enjoying panoramic views of the Sao Bento Monastery and the Guanabara Bay.
  • The lower level contains functional and technical rooms, such as the Museum’s administrative offices, educational facilities, research space, an auditorium, a museum store, a restaurant, lobby, archives, storage and a delivery area.

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  • The building features sustainable design, incorporating natural energy and light sources.
  • Water from the bay is used to regulate the temperature inside the building; this source also supplies water for the Museum’s surrounding reflecting pools.
  • The Museum also uses photovoltaic solar panels, which can be adjusted to optimize the angle of the sun’s rays throughout the day and generate solar energy to supply the building.
  • The visionary museum is focused on answering five key questions: Where did we come from? Who are we? Where are we? Where are we going? And how do we want to live together over the next fifty years?

  • The Museum’s exhibits will address issues including population growth and increased life expectancy, consumption patterns, climate change, genetic engineering and bioethics, the distribution of wealth, technological advances and changes in biodiversity.

  • The permanent exhibition is curated by physicist and cosmologist Luiz Alberto Oliveira and designed by Ralph Appelbaum, with the artistic direction of Andres Clerici.

  • The Museum of Tomorrow is made possible by the City of Rio de Janeiro and the Roberto Marinho Foundation, with the sponsorship of Banco Santander Brasil and the BG project. The project is supported by the Government of Brazil, through the Ministry of Environment and the Financier of Studies and Projects (FINEP).

2010-0601-32A_reduced

Big Bend Building

Big Bend Building is a U shaped building,  would be formed from a very thin structure that curves at the top and returns to the ground, creating what the architecture firm describes as the longest building in the world – at 4,000 feet (1.22 kilometres) end to end.

 

bigbend

Building Name – Big Bend Building

Location            – New York, US

Architect           – Oiio (US Architectural Studio)

Project Type     – Concept

 

Description      –

  • There are lots of skyscraper build now a days, due to lack of space and increase in population, and also there is a race to build a tallest skyscraper.
  • From where to start because every year a new tallest building is built which surpass the previous tallest building.
  • Empire State Building, New York was the tallest building in 1931 and then in 1974 came Willis Tower,Chicago was the tallest and make Empire State Building smaller and this process is goes on because we are in a race.

Arch2O-Tallest-Skyscrapers-01-750x400

  • But what if we substituted height with length? What if our buildings were long instead of tall?
  • Yes this concept is originate by US based architectural firm Oiio who gives us the concept of Big Bend Building.
  • Big Bend Building is a U shaped building,  would be formed from a very thin structure that curves at the top and returns to the ground, creating what the architecture firm describes as the longest building in the world – at 4,000 feet (1.22 kilometres) end to end.
  • “If we manage to bend our structure instead of bending the zoning rules of New York, we would be able to create one of the most prestigious buildings in Manhattan,” the studio said.
  • It has yet to be revealed how narrow the slender structure will be, but the new building will also feature a lift that can “travel in curves”, moving both vertically and horizontally in continuous loops along the length of the glass-lined tower.
  • Overlooking Central Park, The Big Bend would join area of luxury skyscrapers in the city known as “Billionaires’ Row”, nestled between the One57 tower (the eighth tallest building in the city) and the soon-to-be completed 111 West 57th Street building due to be finished next year.
  • Oiio Studio’s design of The Big Bend is a reaction to “an undeniable obsession that resides in Manhattan” where “developers try to maximize their property’s height in order to infuse it with the prestige of a high rise structure,” the company states.

Bahá’í House of Worship-South America

All Bahá’í Houses of Worship, including the Temple of Australia, share certain architectural elements, some of which are specified by Bahá’í scripture. `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stipulated that an essential architectural character of a House of Worship is a nine sided circular shape. While all current Bahá’í Houses of Worship have a dome. Bahá’í scripture also states that no pictures, statues or images be displayed within the House of Worship and no pulpits or altars be incorporated as an architectural feature.
Its nine sides and nine entrances symbolically represent the unity of the human race under the one God, irrespective of ethnic and religious background, according to the teachings of the Baha’i Faith.
The Bahá’í Temple of South America is located just outside of Santiago, in the foothills of the Andes Mountains.
Previously a barren golf course owned by the elite Grange School in Santiago, the 10-hectare site — which took nine years to find – has been transformed into a space envisioned to be open to all, regardless of background, religion, gender, or social standing.

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Building Name  – Bahá’í House of Worship-South America

Location              – Diagonal Las Torres, Penalolen, Region Metropolitana, Chile

Architect            – Siamak Hariri (Hariri Pontarini Architects-Canadian architect)

concept design                    – 2003-2004

schematic design                – 2004

design development         – 2005-2006

construction documents – 2007-2009

construction                     – 2010 – projected completion 2016

Description      –

  • All Bahá’í Houses of Worship, including the Temple of Australia, share certain architectural elements, some of which are specified by Bahá’í scripture. `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stipulated that an essential architectural character of a House of Worship is a nine sided circular shape. While all current Bahá’í Houses of Worship have a dome. Bahá’í scripture also states that no pictures, statues or images be displayed within the House of Worship and no pulpits or altars be incorporated as an architectural feature.
  • Its nine sides and nine entrances symbolically represent the unity of the human race under the one God, irrespective of ethnic and religious background, according to the teachings of the Baha’i Faith.
  • The Bahá’í Temple of South America is located just outside of Santiago, in the foothills of the Andes Mountains.
  • Previously a barren golf course owned by the elite Grange School in Santiago, the 10-hectare site — which took nine years to find – has been transformed into a space envisioned to be open to all, regardless of background, religion, gender, or social standing.
  • Fourteen years in the making, the project represents the last of eight continental temples commissioned by the religious Bahá’í Community – each meant to embody “technological innovation and architectural excellence”.
  • The team drew inspiration from varied sources, such as Sufi whirling dancers – who spin in large skirts as a form of physical meditation – Japanese bamboo baskets, and fragments of shattered glass. The “magic of dappled sunshine beneath a canopy of trees” was also an influence.
  • The resulting design is a sculptural building composed of nine identical, torqued wings. Inside, the temple contains a light-filled space for prayer and meditation that is topped with a central oculus.
  • The superstructure of the wings was built using hundreds of slim-profile steel members and nodal connections.
  • Each of the wings rest on concrete rings and columns on elastomeric seismic isolators, so that in the event of an earthquake, the concrete pads slide horizontally to absorb the shock.
  • The cladding materials used in the project were the result of “an intensive investigation into the material qualities that capture, express and embody light”.
  • The exterior is faced with cast-glass panels that were developed exclusively for this project. For nearly four years, the firm worked in collaboration with artisans at Toronto-based Jeff Goodman Studio to develop the cladding.
  • A remarkable 1,129 unique pieces of both flat and curved cast-glass pieces were produced and assembled with meticulous care to create each of the nine wings.
  • The interior is sheathed in translucent marble from the Estremoz quarries in Portugal. Flat pieces of stone were produced using a water jet cutter, while curved elements were carved directly from blocks.
  • Nine wing-like panels of translucent cast glass subtly spiral to form the temple dome, converging 90 feet above the ground with a clear glass oculus holding a Bahá’í symbol known as “the greatest name”.
  • The building is imbued with a wide range of colours throughout the day, while in the evening, it casts a soft golden glow.
  • “Between dawn and dusk, the temple’s glass and marble become infused with the wide range of seasonal colours that dance across Santiago’s sky,” the team said. “The light that is filtered to the inside of the building shifts from white to silver to ochre, then blue to purple.”
  • The architects noted that the temple’s design was developed through hand sketches, physical models and digital tools.
  • The aim was to achieve an interplay of seeming contradictions: stillness and movement, simplicity and complexity, intimacy and monumentality – a solid structure capable of dissolving in light,” they said.

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Bahá’í House of Worship-Lotus Temple

All Bahá’í Houses of Worship, including the Lotus Temple, share certain architectural elements, some of which are specified by Bahá’í scripture. `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stipulated that an essential architectural character of a House of Worship is a nine sided circular shape. While all current Bahá’í Houses of Worship have a dome.Bahá’í scripture also states that no pictures, statues or images be displayed within the House of Worship and no pulpits or altars be incorporated as an architectural feature

Building Name  – Lotus Temple

Location              – New Delhi, India

Architect            – Fariborz Shaba (Iranian Architect)

Contractor         – ECC Construction Group of Larsen & Toubro Limited

Structural Eng  – Flint and Neill (UK)

Year of Start      – 1976

Year of End       – 13 November 1986

Description      –

  • All Bahá’í Houses of Worship, including the Lotus Temple, share certain architectural elements, some of which are specified by Bahá’í scripture. `Abdu’l-Bahá, the son of the founder of the religion, stipulated that an essential architectural character of a House of Worship is a nine sided circular shape. While all current Bahá’í Houses of Worship have a dome.Bahá’í scripture also states that no pictures, statues or images be displayed within the House of Worship and no pulpits or altars be incorporated as an architectural feature
  • The Lotus temple is one of eight Bahá’í House of Worship facilities in the world and has welcomed over 70 million visitors since its completion, making it one of the most frequented architectural landmarks in the world.
  • From a denominational standpoint, the Lotus temple is open to all practitioners regardless of religious affiliation and functions more as a gathering place of worship to interested visitors.
  • In keeping with Bahá’í scripture, the Lotus temple is organized as a nine-sided circular structure that is comprised of twenty-seven “leaves” (marble-clad free-standing concrete slabs), organized in groups of three on each of the temple’s nine sides with height of slightly over 40 metres and a capacity of 2,500 people.
  • The aforementioned “leaves” are integral to the organization of the space and are classified into three categories: entrance leaves, outer leaves, and inner leaves.
  • The entrance leaves (nine in total), demarcate the entrance on each of the nine sides of the complex.  The outer leaves serves as the roof to the ancillary spaces, complemented by the inners leaves which form the main worship space.  These inner leaves approach, but do not meet at the tip of the worship space and are capped with a dramatic glass and steel skylight.
  • The temple is constructed primarily of concrete and clad in Grecian marble, resulting in the Lotus Temple’s pristine white exterior while the interior of the structure is revealed in true Expressionist fashion, with the precast ribbed roof exposed in the worship spaces.
  • The temple complex consists of the main house of worship; the ancillary block which houses the reception centre, the library and the administrative building; and the restrooms block.
  • Funded almost entirely by private donations, the structure is sited on a magnificent 26-acre landscape including native vegation and a series of nine ponds surrounding the temple.
  • The major part of the funds needed to buy this land was donated by Ardishír Rustampúr of Hyderabad, Sindh, who gave his entire life savings for this purpose in 1953. A portion of the construction budget was saved and used to build a greenhouse to study indigenous plants and flowers that would be appropriate for use on the site.
  • Of the temple’s total electricity use of 500 kilowatts (KW), 120KW is provided by solar power generated by the building. This saves the temple 120,000 rupees per month. It is the first temple in Delhi to use solar power.
  • Appropriately, the Lotus Temple and Sahba have been the recipient of multiple international design awards, included an award in excellence from the Instituation of Structural Engineers (1987), a special citation from the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (1988), designation as one of 100 canonical works by the Architectural Society of China (2000), and an architect award from the GlobArt Academy in Vienna (2000).